SkyEye

Solar System Phenomena — Eclipses in 2020

Eclipses in the Year 2020

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Penumbral Lunar Eclipse : 10 January
The eclipse is completely visible from parts of Greenland, Iceland, Africa, Europe, Asia and western Australia.
 
09 January 23:29 UT Moon at ascending node.
10 January 17:07 UT The penumbral eclipse begins.
19:10 UT Instant of greatest eclipse: penumbral magnitude = 0.90
19:21 UT Full Moon.
21:12 UT The penumbral eclipse ends.
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse : 05 June
The eclipse is completely visible from parts of Africa, eastern Europe, parts of Asia and most of Australia.
 
05 June 17:45 UT The penumbral eclipse begins.
19:12 UT Full Moon.
19:25 UT Instant of greatest eclipse: penumbral magnitude = 0.57
21:04 UT The penumbral eclipse ends.
06 June 18:10 UT Moon at ascending node.
Annular Solar Eclipse : 21 June
The path of annularity crosses central Africa, the southern Arabian peninsula and southern Asia.
 
21 June 03:46 UT The partial eclipse begins.
04:24 UT Moon at descending node.
04:47 UT The annular eclipse begins.
06:40 UT Instant of greatest eclipse: magnitude = 0.99
06:41 UT New Moon.
08:32 UT The annular eclipse ends.
09:35 UT The partial eclipse ends.
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse : 05 July
The eclipse is completely visible from most of North America, South America, and western Africa.
 
04 July 08:18 UT Moon at ascending node.
05 July 03:07 UT The penumbral eclipse begins.
04:30 UT Instant of greatest eclipse: penumbral magnitude = 0.35
04:44 UT Full Moon.
05:52 UT The penumbral eclipse ends.
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse : 30 November
The eclipse is completely visible from North America, and northern and eastern Asia.
 
30 November 07:32 UT The penumbral eclipse begins.
09:30 UT Full Moon.
09:42 UT Instant of greatest eclipse: penumbral magnitude = 0.83
11:53 UT The penumbral eclipse ends.
01 December 07:46 UT Moon at ascending node.
Total Solar Eclipse : 14 December
The path of totality crosses Chile and Argentina.

The image at the right shows a portion of the sky centred on the Sun at the instant of greatest eclipse. The Sun's disk is drawn to scale but the extent of the corona depends upon the level of solar activity at the time.

The Sun is in the constellation of Ophiuchus but below it are the bright distinctive stars of the zodiacal constellation of Scorpius, the scorpion, and to the left is the teapot-shaped Sagittarius. Reddish Antares, the alpha star of Scorpius, is below and to the right of the eclipsed Sun.

Only one naked-eye planet is in attendance to the Sun and that is Mercury. Only 3.2° away (it reaches superior conjunction just six days later), the tiny planet is a bright −1.0 magnitude.
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14 December 11:03 UT Moon at descending node.
13:33 UT The partial eclipse begins.
14:32 UT The total eclipse begins.
16:13 UT Instant of greatest eclipse: magnitude = 1.03
16:71 UT New Moon.
17:54 UT The total eclipse ends.
18:53 UT The partial eclipse ends.

Sources

Eclipse details are provided by Eclipses Online (H.M. Nautical Almanac Office) and EclipseWise.com (Fred Espenak).